March 2012

You are browsing the site archives for March 2012.

No one on a construction project wants to be held captive by a third party’s subjective determination of whether the construction project complied with standards that are open to differing interpretations, such as the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED rating system for sustainable construction.  Construction industry participants can protect themselves from such subjective analyses with certain contractual language incorporating sustainable building practices, but not leaving themselves open to the subjecting decision making of a third-party ratings body.  A few recent examples shed light on this issue. (more…)

What would happen to your construction company’s bottom line if the cost of the material you use most in your building projects increased dramatically?  This is a question your company should be prepared to answer in light of an attempted multi-billion dollar takeover in the U.S. aggregates industry that would combine the nation’s largest two aggregates producers and which could dramatically alter the supply and price of aggregates throughout the United States. (more…)

What would you do if you were denied a certificate of occupancy because a private company decided your building was not “green” enough?  While this may seem far-fetched, it is a question you may have to answer if you work in one of the numerous municipalities that have adopted the U.S. Green Building Council’s “LEED” rating system for “green” construction as part of their building codes. (more…)